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BARGES: All about barges and barging - building, buying, maintaining, equipment, handling on the water, etc.
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TOPIC: Ring of concrete

Ring of concrete 03 Feb 2020 22:49 #113515

  • Balliol Fowden
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It would have been shuttered vertically down to where a vertical line from the edging angle intersects the rounded bilge plating, so the concrete will be in contact with the shell plating. However, moist concrete is alkaline, thus preserves steel if in close proximity. As said however, if the concrete was badly poured and/or is damaged then water could have caused some corrosion, but the worst area is normally along the top edge of the concrete. However, best removed if possible since superfluous.

Balliol.

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Ring of concrete 03 Feb 2020 22:20 #113514

  • Alfred Munden
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Thanks all, brilliant knowledge as usual. We spoke to some shipyards today, and apparently it's most likely laid over a wooden board rather than straight down to the bilge, so not in contact with the hull for the whole quadrant it appears to be. We did out best to check this out, but the floor would require deconstructing to get a look under. We did our best with a cameraphone stuck in a crack, and a bit of probing with a screwdriver, but how it was laid and the condition of it are still a bit of a mystery. We're generally much reassured though.

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Ring of concrete 03 Feb 2020 10:22 #113485

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Ring of concrete 03 Feb 2020 10:20 #113484

This is called 'trimvulling' in Dutch, as mentioned, it is to fill the gap between the wood cargo floor and the ship sides.

In my barge some rivets were starting to get pulled through the hull, and so the insurance inspector told me to remove all the concrete (that was actually very easy with a big enough electric concrete 'hammer')

if the concrete is cracked, there is probably rust under it, and so voids where water can stay and degrade the hull. so. time to get it out..but preferably when on dry land to prevent possible leaking when you find a thin spot or a pulled ot rivet.

It's not a big deal if there is some leaking, but not fun when in the water.
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Ring of concrete 03 Feb 2020 04:41 #113481

My barge had the same. I removed it (with difficulty) and found some degree of pitting, but nothing too serious. I partially covered the gap with a new raised floor, but left a gap for ventilation at the hull sides. Inevitably when the hull flexes, cracks will develop and moisture possibly get in. Better to remove it in my opinion.
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Ring of concrete 03 Feb 2020 00:07 #113479

  • Balliol Fowden
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Hi Alfie,

It is not ballast. It was absolutely normal to pour a fillet of concrete along the sides of the hold from new.

There should be a piece of angle iron, probably about 30 x 30, running fore and aft either side along the top of the bottom frames, to provide a straight edge for the hold sole boards to butt up to. Then the perhaps 150 mm lateral gap between the angle and the hull bilge plating would be filled with concrete up to the level of the top of the sole boards. It was simply too difficult to fit timber sole boards closely to the shape of the bilge plating, and around every frame, sufficiently tightly to stop loose bulk cargoes such as grain from getting through to the bilge, but concrete filled the gap nicely.

It is unlikely that there is any significant corrosion behind the concrete but the place to look is along the top of the fillet, where water may have been standing on top of the concrete.

Balliol.
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Ring of concrete 02 Feb 2020 23:46 #113478

  • Alfred Munden
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Hi all,

Many thanks for advice on our questions so far! One more interesting conundrum involving concrete; we're wondering if anyone has ideas on the why's and how to deal with's..

The boat that we're interested in purchasing has two strips of concrete poured along the turn of the bilges. It looks to be mostly old (maybe 40/50 years) and some potentially newer stuff (not much in comparison). It runs along both sides, all the way along, around 150mm wide and sits flush to the top of the (very old fixed iroko) flooring. Mostly it comes to above the frames, but there are a few points where it's blown through and you can see rusty frame - this is either weeping a tiny bit or gathering condensate. The owner thinks it was poured for ballast, but we're concerned that this may be a sign of the seam having gone - maybe this is a common issue in skutjes? It seems a bit mad for it to have been laid as ballast, unless done by someone who didn't want to lift the floor, or have much of a clue.

I've attached a few photos of the worst bits for reference. As you can see the also concrete wasn't laid brilliantly and has cracked in the odd place.

It's also worth mentioning that the boat is on the market for a 'project' price that does take into account her needing hull work, and that we wouldn't go ahead without a pre-purchase survey with and option to walk away if it looks like a nightmare.

Many thanks,

Alfie.
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